Give the Internet Another Chance

A long time ago in a dark age called the 90’s, an evil group of sorcerers unleashed an abominable creation known as the Internet. This foul blight allowed common mortals to use computers in order to communicate, gaining access to a wealth of information, and perhaps most frightening…read books online. Though a brave covenant of warriors known as the “Book Traditionalists” attempted to free humans of this wretched curse, the power of the Internet proved to be too strong. Bereaved by their loss, the Book Traditionalists went into hiding, but not before vowing to fight the Internet by any means necessary.

Sounds intense right? No matter what side of the fence you’re on, the fact of the matter is that the Internet has given the book world a serious facelift. Yes, the Internet is here to stay, and resistance is futile. Nowadays, eBooks, reader blogs and social media are all an intricate part of the literary universe. People have access to their favorite series with the tap of a smartpad or click of a mouse. Not to mention, fans can now instantly connect with other readers on websites in order to discuss plot, character development and anything else that their hearts desire.

But what about the golden age before the Internet? What about the days when folks could flip the pages of a paperback novel or visit the majestic confines of a bookstore without issue? Well, technically none of that has gone away. While Book Traditionalists might argue that the Internet has destroyed the book world, the truth is that the web has merely enhanced it. Books are now accessible at anytime, from practically anywhere. Bored at the airport? Download an eBook. Want to learn more about an author? Visit their webpage. There’s no limit to what the Internet can do for readers who want to get more out of books.

I grew up in the 80’s and 90’s, a time before the Internet was popular. I can still recall the anticipation I felt when Dad drove my sister and I to the library. I couldn’t wait to get my hands on the latest horror or adventure novel. So, much like many people of my generation, I found myself slightly heartbroken when witnessing the side effects of the Internet on the writing world. Libraries shrank, bookstores closed, and swapping your favorite paperback with friends became extinct. But when I finally sat back and looked at the big picture, it was clear that out of the facets I’d missed from the good old days, there was also a dozen new components that I absolutely couldn’t live without.

I’m fanatic about researching locations, events and people that I’ve recently read about. It’s one of my favorite things to do with books. My wife enjoys reaching out to other readers and discussing the material via fan sites, blogs and Twitter. I know writers who like posting fan fiction, and artists who like sketching character concepts on sites like Deviantart. From downloadable book-soundtracks to online fantasy maps, there’s something for every reader online in order to heighten their reading experience.

George Bernard Shaw one said, “Progress is impossible without change.” People tend to generally dislike change. It’s in our nature. But if we’re going to blame the Internet for corrupting the classical way books were once enjoyed, then we’re missing the big picture. The Internet has helped the literary world explode into a new generation. The web isn’t destroying books, it’s giving them new life.

 

By the Pond

Justin Alcala

Author of Consumed and the upcoming Plenty Dreadful series

http://www.justinalcala.com

English Language and Usage, “Should the Words ‘Internet’ and ‘Web’ be Capitalized?”

http://english.stackexchange.com/questions/644/should-the-words-internet-and-web-be-capitalized

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