Category Archives: travel

Zharmae Publishing Presents: “Consumed” and “The Devil in the Wide City”

“Regardless, for that night, and every night thereafter, I’d make sure to fasten each lock, secure each window, and sleep with my revolver nearby. This lad was a harbinger, but for whom, I did not know.”

-Detective Sergeant Nathaniel Brannick

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Available at Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Consumed-Justin/dp/1937365581/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1439237542&sr=8-1&keywords=Consumed+Justin+Alcala

Coming in October 2015…

“Believe it or not, most of hell has never actually experienced Earth first hand, and assume that it’s all one big Full House episode. Demons love David Coulier.”

-Ned, Fallen Angel

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Check it out on Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/22433711-the-devil-in-the-wide-city

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Pay Attention to Details

Are you pitching your manuscript? If so, then you already know that there are dozens of different guidelines. Some publishers/agents require the first fifteen pages of your book while others ask for a detailed synopsis.  Regardless of demands, if there’s one thing that I highly recommend to all you poets, journalists or novelists out there, it’s follow the guidelines flawlessly. Doing so instantly gives your work the consideration it deserves.

Six years ago, I pitched my first manuscript. Agentless, I went fishing on dozens of publisher’s site, sending my full work to be reviewed. The only problem was, I ignored each and every publisher’s guidelines. After the first three rejection letters, I asked myself, “What am I doing wrong?” Luckily, a friend of mine, and well established writer, was kind enough to guide me in the right direction. He gently popped my bubble by reminding me that every part of a submission is an assessment. You wouldn’t go into an interview and ignore the employer’s questions would you? So why do it with your submission?

Sure enough, once I got with the program, I received four letters of interest. My book wasn’t any better or worse than any other, but I followed direction. I’ve read editor and agent blogs that moan about queries all the time. While I admit they can be tough on writers, it’s still good to err on the side of caution. If you gamble on guidelines, you’re not just risking your manuscript, you’re risking future submissions.

John Wooden once said, “It’s the little details that are vital. Little things make big things happen.” If you’re uncertain about query requests, there are hundreds of online aids that can help. Just make sure that you’re  meticulousness in your submission. It’s all about paying attention to detail, a creative pitch and a great story. Do that, and the rest will fall into place.

“Consumed” Giveaway

Have a Goodreads account? Then stay tuned for the “Consumed” giveaway starting on July 3rd. Five lucky winners will get a paperback copy sent to their homes so long as they…

A) Love horror-fantasy

B) Are unwilling to press charges due to nightmares

C) Be into vampires, and willing to donate blood.

More to come at the link below come July 3rd.

https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/7862799.Justin_Alcala

Travel…It’s Worth It

Several things happen to someone who writes and travels. Firstly, the stress of deadlines, editing and marketing strategies has a way of evaporating like spilled lemonade on a summer sidewalk. Next, new faces and landscapes give birth to a plethora of unrestrained story ideas. Finally, the world is put into perspective- not just the literary world, but life in general. So in light of this, I’m calling out to all my writing companions and asking them to do whatever it takes in order to plan what I had put off for so long…traveling.

When I began writing Consumed, I took advantage of an opportunity to research the Transylvania region. I’d already conducted countless hours of legwork in the States, but nothing prepared me for the insight I’d gain when I finally arrived in Romania. Elements like culture and atmosphere are something that just can’t be described in books or guides. It’s a “boots on the ground” sort of experience. So it goes without saying that when I recently traveled to Ireland for my current project, Dim Fairy Tales (the second installment in the Plenty Dreadful series), the same held true.

The people of Ireland are welcoming, but not overwhelming. The history of the Emerald Isle is far richer than what’s expressed in social studies classes, and perhaps most importantly, stories in Ireland are cherished by its people beyond anything else. Just go to any coffee shop, lounge or pub and listen to the colorful array of accounts and tall tales. It’s  a type of specialized oratory and written folklore that you can’t find anywhere.

But this is not a story about my travels. No, this is a story about your travels. If you’re a writer, I beg you, explore. I know it’s easier said than done, but I beseech you to do what ever you can in order to journey to new towns, countries and continents. Save those pennies and cut those coupons because travel can help inspire, broaden horizons and give piece of mind.

Johann Wolfgang Goethe was one of the most talented German writers of the 18th and 19th century. His early writings were considered entertaining, but short of groundbreaking. It wasn’t until 1786, when he traveled through the Italian Peninsula that Goethe would find his voice. Not just his voice mind you, but according to his journals, his philosophical outlook on life. So much so that in 1816, his published work, “Italian Journey” took center stage in the literary world. None of it would have been possible without travel.

So writers, I implore you, please find a way to travel. Is it expensive? Often, yes. Do you have the time? Probably not. But, will it help in your writing? I’ll guarantee it.

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(My hike on Diamond Hill in Ireland. Epicness at its lamest.)